C

Can you name #5WomenArtists? Here are our 5

Each year, the National Museum of Women in the Arts celebrates Women’s History Month with #5WomenArtists, their project to spread awareness about gender inequity in the art world and beyond.

This year, they partnered up with a Wethos Team of all-women creatives to build out a robust and engaging campaign. To kick off the month, we’re sharing five women-identifying creatives we admire from the across the art and design worlds.


 -

Mona Chalabi is a data journalist, writer, artist, and multimedia producer. Her work combines data and visual design to tell impactful stories. Her exhibition, Who Are You Here to See?, is currently up at Zari Gallery, in London, UK. It interrogates the ways that women and people of color are not allowed to take up space, especially in institutional art settings. Following the theme of visualizing the extent of inequality in art spaces, the show’s most central piece, “Who Are You Here to See?” is a drip painting illustrating the fact that the Tate has 5.5 men for every 1 woman in their collection.

 -

Mina Markham is a front-end architect currently engineering at Slack. She was formerly the Senior Software Engineer for Hillary for America, where she built the campaign’s design system: Pantsuit. Committed to expanding accessibility to the tech and design worlds for women of color, Markham teaches for Black Girls Code, a non-profit introducing programming and technology to a new generation of coders. 

 -

Alice Mizrachi is an artist and educator working across murals, painting, and installations. Her work aims to activate shared space to reflect on social issues impacting local communities. As an art educator, she has been involved with programming at BRIC Arts, The Laundromat Project and The Studio Museum in Harlem. In 2006, she developed an art collective, Younity, to empower more women in street art.

 -

Catt Small is a designer and developer. Currently at Asana, she has designed in the past for Etsy, SoundCloud, and Nasdaq. Invested in making the gaming space more accessible and inclusive, she’s one half of Brooklyn Gamery, a Brooklyn-based game development studio that also organizes diversity-focused game events. She also co-founded Code Liberation, a non-profit organization that teaches people of marginalized gender identities to program games, and taught classes there until her departure in late 2016. Most recently, she became a co-organizer of Game Devs of Color Expo, an inclusive games expo and conference in New York.

 -

Sarah Huny Young is a creative director, visual artist, photographer, event curator, DJ, and founder of the design agency Supreme Clientele. Her work spans The Women’s Freedom Conference, a 12-hour digital conference that centered women of color worldwide; 1839 Mag, a publication that took a nuanced look at the intersection of race, politics, the arts, community and culture in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and AMERICAN WOMAN, a multimedia portrait and documentary series about Black American women.

 -

Because we’re overachievers, here’s a bonus:
D’ana Nunez is an accomplished multimedia artist, independent art director, and founder of COVL. Her work has been in high-demand from brands like Nike, RedBull, Google, and more. In 2019, she teamed up with Instagram to design their activation at Coachella and turned a community basketball court in her hometown of Miami into a vibrant mural with the backing of Crown Royal and Project Backboard. Beyond creating incredible digital art and experiences, D’ana recently launched her own line of clothing and accessories, MadebyCOVL.


Have your own names you’d like for us to spotlight? Let us know!

Shoot us a note at [email protected] or find us on Twitter and share your perspective.